Shrinking attention spans: your first 10 seconds could be your last

Shrinking attention spans: your first 10 seconds could be your last

The 10 Seconds

blog

by Mr Brand

Shrinking attention spans: your first 10 seconds could be your last

With attention spans shrinking, don’t give people an excuse to abandon you in an instant.

The bottom line: If you don’t grab their attention in the first ten seconds, you’ll lose them

information overload confuses human attention spans

The first ten seconds is your invitation to the audience. Get it wrong and people will take another offer. To illustrate the the importance of human attention spans, let’s indulge in some personification.

The good first ten seconds is a friendly looking guy, well-presented, warm smile, he might be gesturing to a barbecue and a crate of beer as if inviting you to join him for a pleasant experience. So you think, ‘Sod it, yeah, let’s have a beer and kick back.’

The bad, however, is a brutish looking man sneering menacingly. There might be what looks like blood smeared on his clothes and a whiff of gunpowder in the air. What you going to do? Most people would probably think, ‘Sod this for a laugh, I’m off.’ It makes no difference that the guy is actually a craftsmen with some fine products to offer. You’ll never know because the first impression was awful.

And that’s how it is with your marketing, whether it be videos, print advertising or web-content: you can have a brilliant offering for the audience, but if you neglect the first ten seconds, they’ll never feel inclined to find out about the good things you do.

So next time you’re creating some marketing material with the aim of drawing people into your funnel of awesomeness, think carefully about the first ten seconds, or it may be your last.

About the author

About the author

Mr Brand is the ambassador for 10 Seconds. He’s on a mission to give marketing professionals a competitive advantage in the Age of Attention Economics. He believes that to gain such advantage you need crystal clear communication. It’s all about the initial moment. Win people’s attention in the first 10 Seconds and you’ve opened the gateway to the final 10 Seconds, that all important conversion. He also likes to challenge conventional wisdom and push the boundaries of what’s possible.

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Attention Economics: how can marketers get a bigger slice of the pie?

Attention Economics: how can marketers get a bigger slice of the pie?

The 10 Seconds

blog

by Mr Brand

Attention Economics: how can marketers get a bigger slice of the pie?

According to Microsoft, the most intelligent species on the planet is now unable to focus or concentrate for more than 8 seconds.

The bottom line: marketers must adapt to this change in behaviour

Humans have a finite amount of attention

Let’s imagine a friendly grandmother’s just baked a pie. If there’s only a few people to feed, no problem – everyone gets a nice portion. But what if there was a hundred people competing for a slice? Shared out equally, the individual portions would be mere slithers. However, that’s in an ideal world. In reality, Grandma has preferences, people she likes more, so she gives them a bigger slice at the expense of others, and inevitably some people end up with nothing. This is attention economics.

In general, the more touchpoints that compete for an individual’s attention, the smaller the slice. And right now the world is full of touchpoints screaming for attention.

So how do we as marketers deal with this? How do we assert ourselves in this attention feeding-frenzy and win a bigger slice of the pie?

Getting to the root of it: the first 10 Seconds

If you can win a person’s attention in the first ten seconds, they’ll give you another ten seconds and so on. However, before they give you a bigger slice, you need to sustain the interest and win their respect. So what’s the best strategy for achieving this?

All roads lead to quality design, production and storytelling

The Hook is a common device in literature, filmmaking and advertising – it grabs attention. The skill of the artist then keeps the audience interested, keeps them turning pages or watching the film. On the flip side, badly crafted material repels us and we switch off.

Even if the audience is genuinely interested, there’s only so much badness they can take. Poor writing, poor production, poor presentation, tiny text, low-contrast font, awful music, not enough negative space – all this destroys attention and causes the audience to move on.

So the quality and artistry of the content is essential for capturing and maintaining the attention. And it all starts with the hook, the first 10 Seconds.

That’s how you get into Grandma’s heart and win yourself a bigger slice of the pie.

About the author

About the author

Mr Brand is the ambassador for 10 Seconds. He’s on a mission to give marketing professionals a competitive advantage in the Age of Attention Economics. He believes that to gain such advantage you need crystal clear communication. It’s all about the initial moment. Win people’s attention in the first 10 Seconds and you’ve opened the gateway to the final 10 Seconds, that all important conversion. He also likes to challenge conventional wisdom and push the boundaries of what’s possible.

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Shrinking Attention Spans – How are they affecting us?

Shrinking Attention Spans – How are they affecting us?

The 10 Seconds

blog

by Mr Brand

Shrinking Attention Spans – How are they affecting us?

The increase in technology in our society provides us with great benefits and is a means of keeping ourselves constantly entertained. Our ability to multi-task has improved, and our children are practically born with the knowledge of how to operate phones and tablets.

In light of all these developments, however, there is one disadvantage that increased technology seems to be having on the human mind. This is the decline in our ability to focus.

By the time you finish reading this sentence your attention will already have wavered, maybe two or three times. A goldfish is currently thought to have a higher attention span than the average human. This might be considered a bit embarrassing at first, but it is best to keep in mind that the goldfish doesn’t have a smartphone to distract them.

Attention Span Statistics

Human attention span in 2000: 12 seconds

Attention span of a goldfish: 9 seconds

Human attention span in 2015: 8 seconds

These results were based on a study undertaken by researchers in Canada, which included 2000 participants who were surveyed, and 112 whose brain activity was monitored. As you can see, since the technological boost at the start of the new millennium, the average human attention span has declined from 12 to 8 seconds.

Even though people who spend a lot of time using technology are unable to concentrate for prolonged periods of time, they have occasional bursts of high attention. Whenever browsing the internet or reading social media posts, there is the instant knowledge of which articles are relevant to them and their interests. It has been suggested that this is the result of our desire to ingest as much knowledge as possible.

This decrease in our attention spans has also affected our memory. At least 7% of people now forget their own birthday every few years. The easiest way for people to recall anything now is for them to actually see it.

Advertising vs attention spans

With the internet constantly being bombarded with new information, as well as our lower attention spans and decreased memory capacity, there has been a drastic change in the way that people will need to advertise. Marketers now have to find a way to give prospective clients the most information in the shortest amount of time, in a form that they will be able to comprehend and remember. This explains why there has been such a significant increase in video advertising; especially the need for extremely short, high quality videos that will have a high impact on the consumer and create a long lasting mutually beneficial business relationship.

About the author

About the author

Mr Brand is the ambassador for 10 Seconds. He’s on a mission to give marketing professionals a competitive advantage in the Age of Attention Economics. He believes that to gain such advantage you need crystal clear communication. It’s all about the initial moment. Win people’s attention in the first 10 Seconds and you’ve opened the gateway to the final 10 Seconds, that all important conversion. He also likes to challenge conventional wisdom and push the boundaries of what’s possible.

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Wanna know more about the 10 Second philosophy?

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